Yoga & Woodland Workout at Hazel Hill

StoveSpring feels like it’s just around the corner, and with that energy we warmly invite you to shake off winter’s hibernation and stretch into our winter yoga and conservation weekend – we’ll be weaving together expansive yoga with rewarding conservation – you can wander through beautiful woods, practice a ‘cat pose’; warm yourself by log-burning stoves, try out some simple meditation techniques – and enjoy great company and shared meals. We’ll be planting Holly and Hawthorn trees, clearing some areas of the woodland to encourage greater biodiversity, and learning about coppicing Hazel.

We have a magical Saturday night planned, led by Agatha Manouche who has many years’ experience of running groups at Hazel Hill. Agatha will be taking us on a personal journey to reflect on what we wish for in 2016, exploring this turning-point in the year as winter transforms to spring.Forest Ark Hazel Hill Wood

Just 7 miles from Salisbury, Hazel Hill Wood is a 70 acre local woodland and centre for conservation, education and community events with a focus on strengthening our connection with nature and exploring sustainable lifestyles.

Our weekend runs from Friday 5th February at 6pm and costs from £70 including all meals and 2 night’s basic accommodation, and we end on Sunday 7th February at 3pm.

Winter woods“Jude, Louisa and I are excited to be running this event which for the first time brings yoga and outdoor activities together“ said Marcos Frangos, General Manager for Hazel Hill Wood and co-facilitator for the weekend.   “We’ll be carrying out fun and rewarding work in the woods, whilst also enjoying some innovative and relaxing yoga in the warmth of our wonderful off-grid buildings.”

More information can be found at www.hazelhill.org.uk or by visiting our Facebook page, and tickets can be booked via Eventbrite searching for Hazel Hill Wood.

Yoga & Conservation Weekend at Hazel Hill Wood, 5-7th February 2016

yogaAs part of the Hazel Hill Conservation Weekend in February, we will be exploring our inner nature through some gentle yoga and movement. Bringing inspiration in from the woods around us, we will playfully blend into our practice the lessons and gifts of nature such as flexibility, mutual support and fluency of movement. As well as balancing yoga and deep relaxation, these sessions will also offer some more dynamic movement, allowing us to energise and awaken our systems, ready for the conservation work outside.

There will be two classes over the weekend, along with an optional meditation each morning – all of which are suitable for any age or ability, and no experience is necessary. Please wear loose, comfortable clothes and bring your yoga mat if you have one, along with a blanket for the relaxation.

_MG_1174The sessions will be led by Jude Clements and Louisa Clark, who have both trained with Integral Yoga; a balanced approach for body, mind and soul.

We hope to see you at this lovely inner and outer nature weekend!

Hazel vs. Hornbeam (the fate of best-laid plans)

Cutting back the Brambles at Hazel Hill Woods

Written by Oliver Broadbent and originally published on his blog at http://eiffelover.com

A recent weekend of conservation work Hazel Hill Woods has revealed to me another woodland analogy for the struggles of daily life, and how we might overcome them. I am calling the analogy, Hazel vs. Hornbeam (the Fate of Best-laid plans).

It emerged when a team of us at the woods were cutting back an area of regenerating hornbeam trees in a clearing. In this patch the hornbeam had shot up to a dense crowd of 6ft-tall finger-thick stems, knitted together with a head-height mat of bramble. Our conservation aim had been to cut these back to chest height to stop them from encroaching on an important butterfly corridor through the woods.

As we slowly cut our way into the dense thicket we started to discover small trees in protective tubes that were being crowded out by the hornbeam and strangled by the bramble. As we uncovered more hidden trees in tubes, we realised that there was a whole array of them that had once been planted. We found hazel, oak, ash, holy and blackthorn struggling to grow in their protective tubes. They had been planted on another conservation weekend years ago but had been forgotten about, and were now being smothered by the naturally regenerating growth.

The woodland context

There is a hundred-year plan at Hazel Hill to transform the forest ecosystem from that of a commercial wood, in which just a few species grow, into a much more biodiverse environment, which is much more likely to be resilient to changes in climate. The area in which we were working had previously been occupied by sycamore trees. This undesirable species had been cleared with a grant from the forestry commission, and in the clearing created, a range of broadleaf species had been planted (the hazel, oak and ash), along with shrubs (the holly and the blackthorn) to create ground-level growth, which had been absent in the commercial forest.

Left to its own devices however, naturally regenerating hornbeam and bramble had quickly grown up and overtaken the planted trees. The former were on the way to winning, the battle for light, already killing some of the latter , and leaving the others struggling. In the short-run there is nothing wrong with hornbeam and bramble, but their short-term success was putting at risk the long-term resilience of the wood by preventing the development of a diverse tree species.

Best laid plans

For me, those broadleaf trees in their little tubes represent best laid plans that were being left unattended because of short-term factors. There are competing conservation priorities in the woods, and these planted trees had been left unattended. Our attention is the light that enables our best-laid plans to flourish. But too often we are forced to direct our attention towards short-term priorities: the deadlines that need to be met, the clothes that need to be folded, the colleagues that need to be briefed, the clients that need to be satisfied.

In the short-term these more immediate matters flourish as they benefit from our attention, but they don’t necessarily lead us to where we want to be. As you wade into the thicket of regrowth, all is lush and green at the top, benefiting as it does from the light of the forest clearing, but underneath, all is brown – there is no diversity. Down there is where our best-laid plans languish.

The feeling of being surrounded

At one point, four of us were working simultaneously and in close proximity in the same thicket. Though we were probably only a few metres apart we couldn’t see each other for all the hornbeam branches and briars that surrounded us. At times, our repeated cuts didn’t seem to be making a difference. I’d turn around and the path that I had driven would have closed in behind me.

This is what it can be like when we feel overwhelmed with matters competing for our attention. After some struggling, my strategy became to just to keep going in one direction. After a sustained, focused effort the lattice of branches and brambles would suddenly give way. A sense of being surrounded turned into a sense of direction; of liberation: I felt freer, able to pause and choose where to go next.

Cutting back our brambles

As I type, I still have some small scratches on my arms from cutting back the brambles. Clearing away some of the things which grab our attention can hurt. There is the pain of letting someone down, or the fear of getting into trouble. But what I noticed as I cut through barbed branches was that they fell away to nothing; untangled and trampled they lost all of their strength, freeing a way through to the trees in tubes.

Personal conservation strategies

Conservation work gives you time to think, and so I set my mind to thinking up strategies for protecting our best-laid plans.

Log what you planted

It sounds simple, but creating a map of what trees we planted where might help us to remember to tend to them every so often. During conservation weekends in which we are planting trees, getting the trees in the ground is a big achievement. It seems unnecessary to create a map of where we planted them. Surely we won’t forget? Inevitably we do. Simply noting down our plans gives us a fighting chance of remembering what we intended.

Regular tending

Once we know what we planted, one strategy is to make time to regularly tend our saplings. It would only take a small amount of systematic attention to keep the hornbeam and brambles in these area in check.

Occasional clearouts

Sometimes though, we don’t have the luxury of being able to provide these things with regular attention. The alternative is to do what we did this weekend – every so often, go in there and cut back all the distractions and bathe our best laid plans with the totality of our attention. In daily life this might amount to a digital detox. Or, for a more substantial clear out, we might consider taking what Daniel Pink calls ‘Sagmeisters’ – regular sabbaticals interspersed in our working lives.

Get real

Our aim wasn’t to clear out all the hornbeam and bramble. Hornbeam regeneration is a natural part of the woodland ecosystem, as are the brambles that weave their way amongst them. We just need to create a bit of space for those slower-growing but ultimately very beneficial species to establish themselves. Similarly, short-term matters are part of the humdrum of daily life – we just need to carve out enough time to give our long-term plans the attention they deserve.

Get things established

Ocourse, the aim of all this cutting back is to enable the hazel, ash, oak, holly and blackthorn to establish themselves. As they start to mature they can look after themselves, and the hornbeam and brambles will subside. This is the point that Steven Covey makes in his book ‘The Seven Habits of Highly Successful People’ when he talks about what happens when we prioritise the important over the urgent. If we make time for the important things, we should see the number of urgent things we need to deal with reduce.

One day, decades after the scratches on my arms have healed, we’ll be able to sit under the shade of these broadleaf trees and know that our efforts to tend to them were worth it.

Seeing the point of woodland conservation…

The speed of nature’s growth in Spring is astonishing: the beautiful carpet of wood anemones shown in the picture burst into flower between Easter Sunday and Easter Tuesday. And they are a great example of why we work so hard to encourage conservation work at Hazel Hill Wood.

One of the main projects for our autumn conservation weekend in 2014 was to create open space in the veranemonesges alongside the path connecting the buildings with the heart of the wood. Previously, this path was a tunnel between two tangled messes of small sycamores, brambles and young hornbeam, almost 2 metres high.

The result of the conservation work last year is not only that we now have a path which is a delight to walk along, and has open views into the wood, but also now has these beautiful flowers, which would otherwise have been shaded out. Almost everywhere at Hazel Hill, we find that when we clear the overgrowth and more light gets to the floor of the wood, flowers spring up where we never had them before.

People find that caring for the wood is also a way of caring for themselves. If you would like to join one of our conservation groups, we have two weekends coming up:

May 15-17 Woodland Conservation & Spring Cleaning

July 24-26 Family Fun Conservation Weekend

For more details and to book see our programme of events

‘Like One Big Family’

conservation weekendHazel Hill’s Conservation and Wellness Weekend

All 16 of us had a lovely time on this weekend, and did a lot for our own wellbeing and the wood’s. Many of the group were new to Hazel Hill, and made a really deep connection with the place and with other people.

We did some great conservation work, landscaping and planting the outdoor cooking area by the main buildings: this included planting a wide range of woodland shrubs, trees and flowers, and creating an amazing large wooden bench, masterminded by Roger Bingham.

Other highlights included large amounts of fantastic food, woodland games, and two great evenings around a campfire, with scary stories, and some lovely poems and songs.

These are some great quotes from the people on the weekend:

“I’m going to take away all the fun, and the love, and the family we’ve made.” (Joshua 6)

“I will take away the feeling of everyone chatting and chatting while they were working and spading. Five stars.” (Theo, 10)

“I had a lovely weekend and made some big life decisions. The community feeling and the mindfulness ideas all helped.” (Maggie, 20)

“I take away a sense of peace. I’ve reconnected with nature, and built a really nice bond. (Mandy)